“Do you have 8 years experience?” She asked

It was at that very moment that I realized anything I said disqualified me from that interview.

“Yes!” I answered back

“Can't be possible since you are 2 years out of college and not even 25 years old.”

I mumbled words that didn’t make sense as I tried to convince the interviewing panel of how I had more skillset than the combined experiences of all the other interviewees.

I got a good laugh from all of them and after some explanation of how that job needed someone with at least 8 years experience and other irrelevant stuff, I managed to get a tap on the shoulder from one of the bosses. He went on to tell me how bold I was and that I will be the first one to know of future openings in the company. More than that he went on to request for my mobile number and asked me to also take his so that we can keep in touch. I still have Fred's number , only that two years down the line he never reached out to me concerning the job opening. Maybe there has never been one yet.

Mind you, I have nothing personal against Fred. In fact, more than once a week we exchange those laughing emojis after one of us posts a funny meme. I guess we are meme buddies!

This days I draw inspiration from my past. I sometimes go through my contact list and wonder how I have certain numbers. Yesterday I saw a WhatsApp status by a number saved as Director Ipsos. It reminded me of a certain night during my hard drinking campus days. We were playing pool by the side having a discussion about Sta-ta; A research software we needed for our econometrics exam that semester.

This guy was drawn into our conversation and after buying us few beers we ended up telling him how we were very good researchers and that we understood modern research tools inside out. We exchanged numbers and four months later true to his word he sent me a link for a research job position. I did the aptitude test and passed, was called for an interview and I failed that thing like nonsense! He texted me later on in the day to wish me luck. I didn’t need results to know I was disqualified. Our interaction faded with time. The lesson I draw from this random pool side meetup is that I said a big Yes and it didn't work. Maybe if I had told him something like I am interested/passionate about research he would have figured something for me then. Not that I have any regrets.

When we say Yes!, we test the scope of our limits. Most times we won’t succeed by saying Yes! to things bigger than what we can handle but the reality of it all is that we will always fall a step above where we previously stood. There is no shame in aiming for the stars and landing on the moon. its far much better than average.

When we say Yes! to bigger things, we are are training our minds to look out for those bigger opportunities hidden in plain sight. Majority of us have conditioned our minds to imagine challenges to be bigger than they actually are.

I was once asked if I knew how to use Microsoft Excel and create pivot charts presentation for the companies annual meeting that was taking place within the next 18 hours. I said Yes! I figured as long as I had the figures and my comprehension skills are somehow good, then I could google my way around everything. To cut this not long story short, the presentation was so good the boss actually deposited something very good in my mobile wallet the next day.

As a parting shot, go out and say Yes! to those opportunities.

May be you are downplaying your abilities.

Maybe it will lead you to a better step and maybe it will turn out to be life changing.

Important of all, you will definitely gain a worthy experience to keep you busy in your old age.

Please don't say Yes! to flying an airplane because then you will only have a one way ticket to the world of dreaming big.

Sometimes I write, Most times I don't.